Not just Surviving – THRIVING!

Continuity management has long been tied to disaster planning and crisis response as fundamental to emergency planning but the reality is: If you’re just practicing business continuity to survive you’re never going to get much out of it.

The key to effective value creation from continuity management is a strategy that builds on how the day-to-day business is designed to create value. Today’s global market puts us all in crisis. Corporate directors are in jail. Cyber terrorists can easily hide across borders around world yet still access information kept locked away. States and countries declare bankruptcy. Instability is everywhere.
Businesses are so interdependent on one another that supply chain and technology are complex grey zones of value and accountability. The bottom line is the business needs to create value to survive. Maybe value means money, maybe it’s customer satisfaction or maybe it’s serving its nonprofit goal. Regardless, the creation of that value must be the crux of your resilience plans.

One of the most common misconceptions of business continuity planning is that it starts with a disaster and in a lucky world no one would need a plan. Luck favors the prepared. A business with a healthy continuity management program doesn’t just survive crisis; it thrives daily. The reality of the business world is that every day is more complex and risk loaded. In order to work toward corporate maturity and institutionalization of the systems that create value you have to structure and live your plan.

 

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DCSPlanning Delicious Tagging

English: Red Pinterest logo

English: Red Pinterest logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

DCSPlanning Delicious Tagging

Per our name change we’ve got a new Delicious tagging site with LOTS of fantastic resources.  In case you’re not sure what Delicious is, it’s just like Pinterest but we use it strictly for professional disaster and compliance related resources.  Please check it out and follow us!


Nine ways to Recognize a Good BCPlan

Here’s a good assessment of 9 ways to Recognize a good BCPlan. Enjoy

Stoneroad's Blog

There are all sorts of templates and thoughts on how the various Business Continuity Management (BCM) program components should look – the “plans.”  Every organization has its own self-styled plan; every consulting agency has its own look and feel and every available free online template looks different from the next.  So how can you recognize a good plan from a really bad and confusing plan?

The following 10 considerations will help you determine if you’ve got a good plan or a not-so-good plan

  1. Action Oriented: If people are expected to follow  and execute plan activities, it must be action oriented.  A document full of theory and suggestions won’t be of any help and will quickly be used to stop a desk from wobbling – or used to capture excess dust that may collect on a shelf.  As a rule of thumb, I tend to look for the first action step/item/activity within the first 5 pages  after…

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How Excellent Companies Avoid Dumb Things – 12 Principles

I just finished an excellent book on driving change in business: Neil Smith’s “How Excellent Companies Avoid Dumb Things”

Here’s the 12 principles that cut through the barriers:

  1. The CEO must personally lead and support and change process carried out across the entire organization and a majority of senior management must also support it.
  2. The entire organization must be engaged in the change process.
  3. The project must be guided by “stars” who are willing to change the status quo.
  4. There must be no up-front targets for the company as a whole or the individual departments within it.
  5. Those who will implement the idea must own the idea.
  6. It must be easy to put ideas into the change process but hard to remove them.
  7. Consideration of ideas must be based on facts and analysis, not opinion.
  8. Consensus must be built.
  9. There must be a focus on increasing revenue, not just reducing expenses.
  10. The change process must not disrupt normal business.
  11. Implementation must be nothing less than 100 percent.
  12. The change process must be about culture change, not just a completed project.

Smith is right, constructive change that you want to see in your business is going to begin at the top and must be measured and deliberate.  Don’t mistake success for luck.  It’s not going to come easy!