Continuity at the North Pole

Consider a complex manufacturing and logistics organisation, based at the North Pole, traditionally very busy around the 25th December. As you might imagine, planning for this event takes all year – no sooner has Santa Claus sat down on Boxing Day then he’’s called to deal with all sorts of unplanned events that require attention.

This year, it started early. Santa was putting the sleigh in the garage when he was accosted by Mrs Claus.

““What are these reports on the radio about you kissing somebody’’s Mommy?”” she demanded.

““W, w, what? Who?”” Santa stammered.

Santa was able to explain that there must have been a case of mistaken identity. Santa’’s image had taken a battering at the hands of an imposter. He was straight onto his Incident Management Team and, following a quick injunction and a public apology, his reputation was restored. He couldn’’t afford for his customers to think he was in anyway naughty.

February brought ice storms to the North Pole.

““Sir, it’’s too cold for the employees to work,”” his Elf and Safety Manager told him, “”I have instructed the elves to down tools.””

Santa sighed and reached for the Yellow Pages, “”Hello, heat engineers? It’s just possible you could save my elves…”.”

Despite the interruption, with a bit of overtime, the Elves were soon back on schedule.

Things carried on uninterrupted until spring saw flocks of birds returning from their winter habitats. Concern rose amongst Santa’’s employees that the wild birds may bring the H5N1 avian flu virus with them, giving rise to concerns about an epidemic. Santa consulted the WHO website for the latest advice.

““There’’s currently little risk for us, the birds are returning from countries where there has been no recorded H5N1 outbreaks, but to be sure, I’’ll employ a couple of special wardens specifically to keep an eye on the well-being of the birds”” he told his elves, hoping that he wouldn’’t have to employ more wardens when the wild reindeer herds returned. He’’d read that the Blue Tongue virus was spreading north and already had problems with one of his sleigh crew having a red nose….

The summer holidays always presented Santa with problems, bored children with too much time on their hands were always on the lookout to cause mischief. This year Santa’’s IT partners informed him one morning that his “Naughty or Nice” database had been hacked! The status of all the children had been changed and there was no way they could sort it out.

Fortunately Santa is pretty tech-savvy. He didn’’t panic and instructed his IT department to delete the data and restore from the back up. As extra insurance, he asked for a full virus check to be undertaken, arranged for the firewall firmware to be updated and instructed all the elves to change their passwords.

There were no further problems to distract Santa. Come the 24th, the Elves loaded up the sleigh and the reindeer team was harnessed. Santa clambered up into the driving seat, picked up the reins with one hand and turned the sleigh’s ignition with the other. There was a short croak and then nothing. He turned the key again, with the same result. Santa realised that when he had been managing his reputation issues last year, he’’d forgotten to turn the sleigh headlights off. The battery had gone flat.

Fortunately, on Mrs Claus’ insistence, the date was the 24th of November and Santa and Elves were running an exercise. Sure, Santa hated having to squeeze into his suit before his annual diet had worked off all the previous year’s mince pies, the Elves got cranky at having to load and unload the sleigh and the reindeer team disliked being taken from their warm stables, but Mrs Claus had seen the benefits of exercising ahead of “the “big off””. The battery was rigged up to the charger and, come the big day, all the good children received the right presents thanks to Santa’’s business continuity arrangements….

Just a bit of fun!  Special thanks to Richard Jones!

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DCSPlanning Delicious Tagging

English: Red Pinterest logo

English: Red Pinterest logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

DCSPlanning Delicious Tagging

Per our name change we’ve got a new Delicious tagging site with LOTS of fantastic resources.  In case you’re not sure what Delicious is, it’s just like Pinterest but we use it strictly for professional disaster and compliance related resources.  Please check it out and follow us!


Book Review – Surviving Survival

English: Great white shark at Isla Guadalupe, ...

English: Great white shark at Isla Guadalupe, Mexico, August 2006. Shot with Nikon D70s in Ikelite housing, in natural light. Animal estimated at 11-12 feet (3.3 to 3.6 m) in length, age unknown. Français : Photographie d’un Grand requin blanc (Carcharodon carcharias) de 3,5 mètres environ, prise à l’île Gadalupe en août 2006. Matériel : Nikon D70s dans un caisson étanche Ikelite. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Did you know you have a frog and a rat in your brain that help you survive?  I learned that while reading Laurence Gonzales’ latest book, “Surviving Survival”.  The title, though initially vague, points out an excellent conundrum:  what do you do once you’ve survived a crisis?  You don’t come out the other side of any crisis the same so how do you assimilate the  “survivor” parts of you into your old view of yourself.  You must be a whole being to move comfortably forward.

Often complex and though I have a little whiplash from descriptions of “drama in real life” to deep diving in the neurology, I give it 4 of 5 stars.  Great book!


Nine ways to Recognize a Good BCPlan

Here’s a good assessment of 9 ways to Recognize a good BCPlan. Enjoy

Stoneroad's Blog

There are all sorts of templates and thoughts on how the various Business Continuity Management (BCM) program components should look – the “plans.”  Every organization has its own self-styled plan; every consulting agency has its own look and feel and every available free online template looks different from the next.  So how can you recognize a good plan from a really bad and confusing plan?

The following 10 considerations will help you determine if you’ve got a good plan or a not-so-good plan

  1. Action Oriented: If people are expected to follow  and execute plan activities, it must be action oriented.  A document full of theory and suggestions won’t be of any help and will quickly be used to stop a desk from wobbling – or used to capture excess dust that may collect on a shelf.  As a rule of thumb, I tend to look for the first action step/item/activity within the first 5 pages  after…

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